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Six Daily Tips for Optimising Your Health This Autumn

Introduction: 

 As seasons change and we welcome crisp Autumn days, it might be time to swtich up your routine to optimise it for the comings months. Here Nutritional Therapist Katie Morley shares some of her top tips for staying on top of your health and feeling your best in the colder, darker months of the year. 

 1. Strengthen your immune system

Immunity is everything as we transition from one season to the next. In addition to including nutrient-dense foods in our diet, it’s key to consume probiotics with a broad array of species to support our immunity. With 70-80% of our immune system is in our gut, start by including probiotic-rich foods such as sauerkraut, yoghurt, kefir, kimchi and tempeh into your diet to support your immune system. If you’re looking for an on-the-go solution, try our Berry Gut Health shot.  You could also try our Immunity Cleanse or our Immunity+ Juice Plan, which includes a mix of immune-boosting juices and juice shots containing varied fruits and vegetables as well as vitamin C to support the immune system. 

2. Get outside for at least 30 minutes per day, preferably early morning
 

Going for an early morning walk has significant mood-boosting health benefits, particularly during colder months when daylight is limited. Aim to get outside first thing, even on cloudy days, for at least 30 minutes. The exposure to natural light helps to reset your circadian rhythm (your body’s internal clock) and stimulates the release of feel-good endorphins that will elevate your mood throughout the day.  

3. Nourish your brain with essential nutrients 

Your brain is constantly working overtime, even while you’re asleep, to control your thoughts, movements and breathing. To support optimal brain function, focus on nutrient-dense foods packed with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Examples include cognitive-boosting green, leafy vegetables, berries, and nuts and seeds. For a convenient way to supply your brain with essential nutrients, try our Turmeric Shot containing 100% of your RI of vitamin B12 which supports our normal psychological function. 

 4. Eat what’s in season right now  

Eating in season comes with an array of benefits. Naturally grown foods are more nutrient-dense, making them tastier and healthier for you. It’s also more cost-effective to choose what is in season. In November, think about incorporating kale, sweet potatoes, carrots, ginger, beetroot and broccoli into your meals. You can also find all of these nutritious vegetables in our warming and nutrient-dense range of soup cleanses.

 5. Keep your body moving 

Simply moving your body, whether that’s going for a brisk walk, a gentle yoga flow or an intense circuits class leads to positive changes in your brain. These changes are linked with lower levels of stress, depression and anxiety. This is particularly helpful for those experiencing seasonal affective disorder (SAD) during the winter months. 

6. Add adaptogens into your daily routine 

A lesser-known tip for staying energised during the change of seasons is by including adaptogens into your daily routine. Adaptogens help your body to cope with mental and physical stress. They are also known for elevating energy, boosting immunity and supporting sustained focus. Ashwagandha and rhodiola are two powerhouse adaptogens for the colder months and can typically be found in capsule form, in herbal teas or in a powder which can be added to smoothies and soups. 

 Conclusion: 

Preparing your mind and body for seasonal transitions is essential to keep your health strong and your energy levels high. A combination of eating seasonal foods, getting natural sunlight first thing in the morning, moving your body, strengthening your immune system with the right foods and incorporating adaptogens wherever possible is a surefire way to stay on the right track. 

Author: Plenish Nutritionist, Katie Morley 

DipNT, mBANT, mANP, CNHC 

Email: [email protected] 

Website: www.holsome.uk